Sunday House Porn!

Howzabout 100 new high-definition Hohenadel House photos at Felicte’s Flickr?! (compliments of the not-so-sunny Florida skies this weekend)

A picture might be worth a thousand words, but a whole bunch of ’em together is like busy chat room history. So much to absorb! And so addicting!

Old houses like Hohenadel House are ridiculously photogenic — it’s part of the fun of owning a house with so much history and character.

But even the most cookie-cutter house has personality. Total lack of adornment makes a strong style statement, actually, and even the clunkiest Brutalist concrete box can seem beautiful in the right angles and context.

Viewing our own four walls with a photographer’s eye, old corners come into new light. Little details emerge, never before noticed or appreciated. Funny how the darndest stuff comes into focus when you peer through a camera’s viewfinder.

Thanks to digital photography, you no longer need a separate income to support an interest in taking pictures. Decent cameras are pretty affordable these days, too, especially the used/reconditioned market (including major players like Nikon, Canon, Overstock and Adorama).

You can also participate in free “classes” at the Digital Photography School, where a community of professionals helps inform, educate and inspire the coolest digital pics possible. Their weekly photo challenges are a blast and never fail to attract an interesting array of contestants (and photographic learning opportunities).

General Online Tips for Photographing Your House’s Special Charm:

Use the highest-quality resolution, saved in the largest format possible (JPEGs or GIFs)

Go flashless whenever possible, especially around reflective surfaces like windows, glass, mirrors, monitors & TV’s…

Use the MACRO setting for close detail, or to zoom in on a subject in the foreground while blurring out the background.

Keep it steady! Don’t tilt to shoot higher or lower — instead, move the camera so it’s level with the subject.

Use a tripod whenever possible, especially at dusk, indoors or other low-light situations.

Tidy up , tighten your composition. Move whatever isn’t essential outta frame.

Try every angle to shoot the room, and then try some more. Stand on furniture, even.

Practice MACRO on unique architectural details.

 

What’s your house’s story?  Tell it through photography, and add your own special contribution to the ranks of (ahem) amateur “house porn.”

 

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